Did You Know?

Did you know that a housekeeper’s cupboard was more than a place to store linens?

Did you know that a housekeeper’s cupboard was more than a place to store linens?  These large and imposing pieces of furniture with drawers below and cabinets on top also stored the best china and glass, and occasionally, the more valuable staples, such as tea and coffee. Generally under lock and key, it was the head housekeeper, much like Mrs. Hughes in Downton Abbey, who oversaw the contents.

While most of these cupboards were utilitarian in their appearance, some were crafted to reflect the status of the household.  Take this superb housekeeper’s cupboard with such fine details as mahogany crown moulding and banding, as well as a fusee clock.  It must have come from a rather well-to-do manor house, but can only be found now at Mill House Antiques.  More than an ordinary experience.

Mill House Antiques Cupboard

 

Did You Know?

Did you know? Austro-Hungarian cabinet makers were considered some of the finest

Did you know that 19th century Austro-Hungarian cabinet makers were considered some of the finest across the continent?  Rightly so, as they took great pride in their work and went the extra mile by hand carving a moulded edge along the inner edges of drawers — something rather unique for cabinet makers of that period.

Take this fine example of a chest of drawers from Budapest that incorporates a drop down secrétaire.  With its handsome walnut root veneer and wonderful brass, the quality of its construction is readily apparent on the outside, but one look inside shows the careful attention to detail rarely seen in chests and found only at Mill House Antiques.  More than an ordinary experience.  #millhouseantiques #antiques

 

Mill House Antiques

 

Did You Know?

Did you know?

Did you know that a tramp freighter was so named for its itinerant travels and not the promiscuous nature of its sailors? Without a set itinerary, the tramper would sail between ports usually with a single cargo. While quite numerous from the late 1800’s to the early 1900’s, tramp freighters became obsolete as larger cargo vessels were required following WWII.

After reading the ship’s log, one could easily conclude that the S.S. Alyestone was indeed a tramp freighter, or perhaps the original love boat. The ship’s log provides a long list of doctor visits by various seamen for, shall we say, “personal reasons.” Not only can you discover this wonderful ship builder’s model at Mill House Antiques, but you can also find excerpts from the ship’s log. More than an ordinary experience.

Mill House Antiques Ship

 

Mill House Events

Maestro Leif Bjaland with the Waterbury Symphony Orchestra this evening at Mill House Antiques

We are looking forward to hosting the Waterbury Symphony Orchestra annual benefit this evening at Mill House Antiques. The event will take place in the gardens from 5:30 to 8:30pm.  Join us for wine and music.

 

millhouseantiquessymphony

Only at Mill House Antiques.  More than an ordinary experience.

Mill House Antiques Finds

Grand Budapest Finds

This winter our travels took us to Eastern Europe where we explored new markets.  While we did not enjoy the luxuries of the fictional Grand Budapest Hotel, we did enjoy the city of Budapest–a city of incredible charm and wonderful antiques.  We acquired two spectacular secrétaires, a flame mahogany cylinder desk and a walnut root abattant.  Neither an everyday find and only at Mill House Antiques.  More than ordinary experience.

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